Winter Safety

#1

According to the CDC, cold
weather is the top weather-related
cause of death in the U.S.

 

 

63%

Approximately 2,000 people die from
weather-related causes each year.
Of those deaths, 63% were related to
cold weather.

 

  

Protecting Your Heart

 

You may not be able to totally avoid going outside in the blustery weather, but here are some simple steps you can take to protect your heart health.

  1. Layer up. The warmer your body is, the easier it is for your heart to pump properly in the cold temperatures.
  2. Monitor your blood pressure. Blood pressure tends to rise in cold weather, so monitor your levels frequently for any changes.
  3. Give yourself a break. Take frequent breaks during shoveling so you don’t over-stress your heart.
  4. Know the heart attack warning signs. Immediately call 911 if you think you may be experiencing symptoms.
  5. Take frequent breaks. If you are shoveling or performing any other outdoor activity, be sure to give yourself a break.
  6. Stay hydrated. It is important to stay hydrated, especially if you are outdoors in the cold weather.
  Call 911 when you have…

 Heart Attack 

 Warning Signs

 

 UPMC Jan20 Chart300x340px

-Cold sweat

-Shortness of breath

-Abdominal pain

-Paleness or clammy skin

-Unusual fatigue

-Dizziness or lightheadedness

-Heart flutters

Nausea or vomiting

Inability to sleep

 

 

 

Stroke
Warning Signs

 

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Face drooping

 

Arm weakness

 

Speech difficulty

 

Time to call

 

 

  Other Ways to Protect Yourself
  • Evaluate your front/back porch footing before going outside.
  • Thoroughly and regularly salt driveways, sidewalks, and stairs.
  • Watch where you are walking and walk carefully.
  • Stretch before any physical exercise, including shoveling or scraping.
  • Stay hydrated while exercising and shoveling snow.
  • Stay warm. Avoid frostbite and hypothermia – bundle up! Wear layers.
  • Make sure that your exhaust pipes are clear before starting your car.
  • Be sure to have a working carbon monoxide detector in your home.
  

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